LightAuto

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The story of the light sports roadster

Part Three The Glory Years 1930 1940

This was a time when the British sports car came of age and flourished, when there was always a selection of light sports roadsters available to the young man of comfortable means to enjoy the almost traffic free country roads. The MG “C” type Midget and “Magna“came along in 1931 and the “Magnette” a parallel model in 1932, also in 1932 the first Alta the “9HP” was produced along with a new Frazer Nash, the “TT Replica”, the Wolseley “Hornet” and a another variant of the MG “Midget” the “J2.”” In 1933 Austin introduced a new Seven roadster, the “65”, later to be the “Nippy”, Singer the “Nine Le Mans” and the Vale “Special” made a appearance. Morgan produced the last variant of their sporting three wheelers, the final “Supersports”, this was produced until 1939. Nineteen thirty four was another bumper year with another version of the Austin Seven, the “Speedy”. The only none English car available in the decade, the Fiat “508s Balilla”, appeared at this time. Triumph introduced a version of their Gloria range, the “Gloria Southern Cross”, and Riley the “Imp” and the “MPH”. The HRG “1 1/2 litre” and the Squire “1 1/2 litre” came along in 1935. That was the year Morgan produced their first four wheeled car the “4/4”. Things began to get quieter after that, with the Riley “Sprite” and the MG “TA Midget” in 1936, and nothing until in 1939 when the last pre-war MG model the “TB Midget” was introduced along with the HRG “1100” and “1500”. With the coming of the war all car production stopped until 1945 and that’s another story.

MG “C” Type Midget 1931-1932 Light Sports Roadster England

A racing sports car was developed from the “M” type Midget, the “C” type, this was offered with a tuned 746 cc. short stroke versions of the Midget S.O.H.C. engine making it eligible for the 750 racing class. The highest output unblown version available gave 44 bhp at 6500 rpm and the Powerplus supercharged version 62.5 bhp This was mated to an ENV preselector gearbox and a special body with a radiator cowl, an undershield and fold flat aero screens. The supercharged model cost £345, the simpler model £295, but this didn’t deter purchasers as a total of 44 were sold. The successors to the “C”, were the “J3.” and “J4”, Both with the 746cc engine with a Powerplus supercharger, the “J4”, a larger unit with 18 lbs of boost and an output of 72BHP. They had a “J2”, type chassis frame, 12inch brakes and an ENV gearbox. Thirty 0ne were made in 1932 and 1933.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. S.O.H.C.746 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse preselector.

Suspension front. 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum .

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.12 cwt.

Wheelbase.6ft 6 inches.

Engine output. 44 to 52.5 bhp.

@ r.p.m.6500.

Max speed.

MG Magna & Magnette 1931-1936 Light Sports Roadster England

The common feature of the Magna’s and Magnette’s was the s.o.h.c. six cylinder engine originally used in the Wolseley Hornet. Two engine capacities were used in a bewildering varieties of models, 1271cc and 1087cc. The F2 Magna was the first 2-seater of them all,fitted with a Midget body, the 1271cc engine only producing 37bhp, it was not a great performer and was made in 1931 and 32. It was superseded by the L2 Magna, this had the 1087cc version of the engine, 12 inch brakes as used on the J2 and a top speed of 75 mph. Available in 1933 and 34. All Magna’s were fitted with a 4 speed crash box. The K2 version of the Magnette of 1932 was fitted with 1087 cc engine and a 4 speed crash box or the 1271 cc engine with an output of 48.5 bhp at 5500 rpm and a 4 speed preselector gearbox. The K3 Magnette is the outstanding car of the group, fitted with a supercharged version of the 1087 cc engine producing 120 bhp and an ENV preselector gearbox. Nuvolari won the 1933 TT in one. The N Magnette was next, this time fitted with a 56.6 bhp version of the 1271 cc engine, made from 1934 to1936. Finally came the NE Magnette, with a 74 bhp engine, winning the 1934 TT.

Layout. Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Steel channel.

Engine. 6 I.L. W.C. S.O.H.C. 1087cc & 1271 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. 8inch to 13inch drums.

Brakes rear. 8inch to 13inch drums.

Weight. NE Magnette 16 1/4 cwt.

Wheelbase. 94 3/16 inches .

Engine output. 37 to 120 bhp.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 75 mph minimum.

Alta 9HP & 1 1/2 litre. 1932-39 Light Sports Roadster England

Produced by Geoffrey Taylor in his workshop near the Kingston Bypass,Tolworth, all the cars were fitted with Alta engines, which was the companies primary business. Starting with special alloy cylinder heads for Austin Sevens, Taylor went on to make an 1100cc. 2-seater car with a D.O.H.C. light alloy engine with wet cylinder liners. As it created considerable interest he decided to put it into limited production. The engine produced 49 bhp. or with the addition of a supercharger 76 bhp. With a low under slung chassis, four speed crash or preselector gearbox, 13 inch brake drums and on most cars beam axles and leaf springs, but some later cars were reputed to have all independent suspension. After 1939 car production stopped and Taylor concentrated on producing engines for HWM and Connaught racing cars, also cylinder head conversions of Morris minors.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. D.O.H.C.1074 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front.Beam axle 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear.Live axle 1/4 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front.13 inch Drum.

Brakes rear.13 inch Drum.

Weight. 14cwt.

Wheelbase.8ft.

Engine output. 49 bhp or 76 bhp blown.

@ r.p.m.

Max speed. mph.

Frazer Nash T T Replica 1932-1938 Light Sports Roadster England

More T T Replica’s were made than all other Frazer Nash models in the 1930’s ,83 in all. It was in the classic Frazer Nash mould with a tubular front axle suspended on 1/4 elliptic springs, a simple ladder frame with a chain gang transmission. Various engines were fitted during it’s time in production, The Meadows two port deflector head 4ED, on early cars, then the D.O.H.C. Blackburn six of 1660 cc. and from 1934 the Gough S.O.H.C. four of 1499 cc.The top speed for a T T Replica was 88 mph. Other models made during the same period, all only made in small numbers and basically similar to the T T Replica, were the Nurberg, a competition model with a short chassis and a Meadows engine. An economy model the Exeter of 1932 also had a meadows engine producing 45 bhp The Shelsley, made between 1934 and 1936 had cantilever front springs, bigger brake drums and was fitted with a twin Centric blown Gough four, giving it a maximum speed of 105 mph Unblown Gough or Blackburn engines were an option.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. .O.H.V.1496 cc.(Meadows.)

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse by chain.

Suspension front. 1/4 elliptic.

Suspension rear. 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 9ft.

Engine output.

@ r.p.m.

Max speed. mph.

MG J2 Midget 1932-1934 Light Sports Roadster England

The successor to the M type Midget in two-seater sports roadster form was the J2 of 1932. It had a twin carburettor version of the 847cc engine that produced 36 bhp. at 5500rpm. The changes to the body,a slab tank with spare wheel mounted behind, a raised scuttle and cut away doors were to be MG features for the next twenty three years. By 1934 when production ceased 2083 had been made. It was priced at £199. 10 shillings and was capable of 65mph. In 1934 the PA came along, with a modified engine with a three bearing crankshaft, a longer wheel base, revised steering and 12 inch brake drums. It could now make 75mph. still with an engine capacity of 847cc. Production of all types including coupes reached 2000 by 1936 when it was discontinued. The PB the next model in the line, had a 939cc. Engine that produced 43bhp. at 5500 rpm. Overlapping the PA from 1935 to 1936, 526 of all types were made.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel ladder frame.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. S.O.H.C. 847cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle/ 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle/ 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum. Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft 2inches.

Engine output. 36bhp.

@ r.p.m. 5.500 rpm.

Max speed. 65 mph.

Wolseley Hornet Special 1932-1935 Light Sports Roadster England

Developed from the Hornet mainly because of it’s engine, a chain driven cylinder S.O.H.C. six. The 12 HP of 1932 a 1271cc. with twin carburettors and an oil cooler, producing 47 b.h.p. at 5000 rpm. in 1934. With a remote control 4 speed box, a top speed of 75 m.p.h. and a price of £275. 2307 made. 14 HP of 1935 with the same engine but of 1604cc. It was lighter than the 12HP.but both were not a good handlers, More “Café racers” of the 1930’s.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 6 I.L. W.C. S.O.H.C. 1271cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle, 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle, 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft 6 1/2 inches.

Engine output. 47 bhp.

@ R.P.M. 5000.

Max speed. 75 mph.

Austin Seven 65 Nippy & Speedy 1933-37 Light Sports Roadster England

In 1933 Austin added another sporting Seven to the range “65”, it was different to the Ulster by having an engine only producing 21bhp. a round back body curved front axles and underslung rear springs. This was superseded by the Nippy after 1934, it was of the same form as the “65”, but fitted with the latest specification engine with a small increase in output.The Nippy went on to be the last of the sporting Sevens, remaining in production until 1937. Between 1934 & 1935 another sports Seven was offered the Seven Speedy. It had a pointed tail body, a “Vee” screen and a 23 bhp. engine with a finned sump, pressure feed crankshaft, and a close ratio gearbox. Later Nippy’s were fitted with this engine. Never very fast, these cars were always fun to drive.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. S.V.747 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front.Beam axle transverse 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle1/4 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum .

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 6ft 3 inches.

Engine output. 21 to 23 bhp.

@ r.p.m.

Max speed. mph.

Singer Nine Le Mans 1933-1937 Light Sports Roadster England

The Nine Le Mans sports appeared in 1932 developed from the singer Nine, with a 972cc chain driven S.O.H.C. four cylinder two bearing crankshaft engine capable of high revs, with twin carburettors and a vertex magneto. The name was adopted after qualifying at Le Mans. It had Lockheed hydraulic brakes, a slab fuel tank and cycle type wings, and was useful in trials and rallies price in 1933 £185, Capable of nearly 65 m.p.h. and 0-50 in 25seconds. The 1 1/2 litre Le Mans introduced in 1934 with a 1493cc six cylinder triple carburettors, coil ignition or later a Scintilla magneto. On the same 92inch wheel base frame as the Nine Le Mans, The 1935 Le Mans Special Speed model would accelerate from 0 to 50 in 17 seconds and had a top speed of 75 mph.

Layout. Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis.

Engine. 4I.L W.C. S.O.H.C. 972cc.

Engine. 6I.L W.C. S.O.H.C.1493cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle 1/2 elliptic.

Steering. Brakes front. Drums, hydraulic.

Brakes rear. Drum, hydraulic.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft 7inches.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 65 to 90 mph.

Vale Special 1933-1935 Light Sports Roadster England

The Vale Special, made in Kilburn at Maida Vale, was notable for the extremely low built of it’s chassis which was underslung close to the ground.This gave the little car, which was powered with a Triumph 832 c.c. engine and had it’s steering box and track rods set ahead of front axle in the very short frame, extraordinary road holding. It was the sponsor’s delight to take clients for a rapid run down the road and, without shutting off, slide the car round a lamp-post and back the way it had come at undiminished speed. If the customer did not collapse with a nervous breakdown he usually paid for a Vale on the spot. At the time, 1933, these little sports cars were thought to smack rather to much of the “boy’s racer” as they had large scuttle cowls, stone guards, quick-action filler caps and other unnecessary adornments. But they were quite fast and, on corners, very stable. The price was below £200 and the original 8 h.p. model was followed by 10 h.p. and 12 h.p. versions, using Covertry Climax power units of the I.o.E. type used for contemporary Triumph cars.Special features included alloy fireproof bulkhead, extreme accessibility of the engine, properly mounted spare wheel, clever shock-absorber anchorage's and other items not in general use. In all, 103 of these Vale Specials were made, over 3 1/2 years. A racing Vale Special with supercharged 1,500 cc Coventry Climax engine and many special features was built for Ian Connell and raced by him with some satisfaction.It could exceed 130 mph. and out accelerate an E.R.A. for the cost of £675.

Layout. Front engine /rear wheel drive.

Chassis.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. S.V. 832 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle, 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle, 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum, hydraulic.

Brakes rear. Drum, hydraulic.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 65 mph.

Morgan Supersports 1933-1939 Three wheeled cyclecar England

The 1933 Morgan Supersports was the ultimate rendering of a concept first seen in 1910, a three wheeled cyclecar with a “V” twin engine mounted in a tubular frame out front between the two front wheels. As Morgans still do, the three wheeled Morgan had evolved rather than made leaps forward, even so the last Supersports was a long way from the original economy cyclecar conceived by H.F.S. Morgan. With a Machless or JAP O.H.V. engine, a three speed gearbox, Brakes and shock absorbers on all corners, with detachable wire wheels and electric lighting as up to date as the original concept would allow. The advantage the concept gave was light weight and with that a relatively high power to weight ratio and good all round performance for the size of engine, a maximum speed of 80mph, all for the price of £135 in 1934.

Layout.Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Tubular frame.

Engine. “V” twin. W.C. or A.C. O.H.V. 990cc or 1096cc.

Transmission. 3 speed & chain final drive.

Suspension front.Sliding pillar I.f.s. coils.

Suspension rear. Trail arms / 1/4 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 80 mph.

Fiat 508s Balilla Sports 1934-1937 Light Sports Roadster Italy

The Balilla Sports had good road holding and an excellent performance due to it’s low weight with a quite high axle ratio, a close ratio gearbox, high geared steering and lockheed hydraulic brakes, in fact a good road car, as opposed to the British sports cars that had evolved into mainly trials orientated cars with a rear weight bias and low gear ratios. With a handsome lightweight body, Rudge knock off wheels and a price in 1936 of £238, capable of 70 mph with 60 in third it was a splendid little car.

Layout. Front engine/ rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. .O.H..995 cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.12 cwt.

Wheelbase.7ft 6 1/2 inches.

Engine output. 36 bhp.

@ r.p.m.4000.

Max speed.70 mph.

Triumph Gloria Southern Cross 1934-1937 Light Sports Roadster England

Based on the Gloria Monte Carlo tourer, the Gloria Southern Cross was the 2-seat variant in the Gloria range. We are concerned with the smaller engined version here, with the 1232 cc 4 cylinder engine of the Gloria Four Vitesse with twin carburettors, large valves and polished inlet ports producing 50bhp, the shortest version of the under slung cruciform chassis frame. A spiral bevel final drive and hydraulic brakes. With an exposed rear mounted petrol tank and twin spare wheels mounted on the back. It was considered to have excellent roadholding, brakes and steering.

Layout. Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Pressed steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. I.o.E. 1232cc.

Transmission. Suspension front. Beam axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 96inches.

Engine output. 50 bhp.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed.

Riley Imp MPH & Sprite 1934-1938 Light Sports Roadster England

Introduced in 1934 the Imp had the same 4 cylinder engine layout and capacity as the Brooklands, fitted with twin-SU carburettors, magneto ignition was an option with a shorter wheelbase at 7ft 6inches, using a new frame upswept over the front axle and underslung at the rear. With the option of an ENV preselector or a close- ratio manual gearbox,. A pretty 2-seater body with flowing wings and a short tail with an inset spare wheel was standard. The MPH, also introduced in 1934, is arguably the most beautiful of all the classic sports roadsters, with it’s long bonnet, flowing wings and crisp blend of style and function. This 2-seater sports car was fitted a six cylinder version of the great, high camshaft Riley engine. The smallest of the engine options available at 1458 cc make it eligible for this study. At £550 only 15 buyers were found, but that got you a chassis based on the 1933 TT cars, large finned brake drums, lots of light alloy fittings and a maximum speed of 90mph. The last of the Riley sports cars was the Sprite of 1936 used the latest version of the 4 cylinder engine at 1496cc. A maximum speed of 85 to 90 mph. The body was the main difference from the others, being more generous in cockpit width and with full flowing wings and a front grill.

Layout. Front engine /rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Steel channel.

Engine. . 4 I.L W.C O.H.V. 1089cc and 1496cc. 6 I.L W.C O.H.V. 1459cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft 6inches and 8ft 1 1/2 inches.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 75 to 90 mph.

HRG 1 1/2 Litre 1935-1938 Light Sports Roadster England

The HRG was the logical successor to the Frazer Nash. After the demise of the Godfrey/Frazer-Nash G.N. H.R.Godfrey went into business repairing G.N.s and later introduced a special long wheelbase version of the Austin Seven, while Captain Frazer-Nash evolved the sports car of his name. In 1935 Godfrey re-entered the motor industry with the H.R.G. sports car which derived its initials not from his own but because this was a venture of three me: Halford, Robins and Godfrey. The idea was to produce from a small works adjacent to the Kingston By-pass road a genuine 1 1/2 litre sports car. The H.R.G. closely resembled the Frazer-Nash in respect to its stiff, appendix-jarring suspension by the familiar 1/4 elliptic front springs and a radiator carried well behind the tubular front axle, which employed the front shock-absorber arms to locate it. However, even Godfrey was convinced that chain transmission was a thing of the past, and a Moss gearbox and conventional back axle was adopted for the new car. With this, the short knife-like central lever could be sliced through the exposed gate. A simple 2-seater body with slab tank at the back was devised and,with a Meadows 4ED twin-carburettor engine, the H.R.G. fulfilled many a sportsman’ dreams. Many well-known drivers began to buy the H.R.G., which was priced in 1937 at £395. Up to the war the no-nonsense H.R.G. certainly found its place amongst those who had little use for the contemporary trails-bred small sports car. Note. Total production 26.

Layout.Front engine/rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Channel frame.

Engine. 4I.L. W.C. O.H.V. 1496cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Tubular axle /1/4 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 8ft 6inches.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 90 mph.

Squire 1 1/2 litre 1935 Light Sports Roadster England

The Squire was not made in any very great numbers, But it was a super sports car with an idealistic specification, built at Remenham near Henley-on-Thames in the mid-1930s. The engine was a twin o.h.c. 1 1/2 litre 4-cylinder based on the R.I. Anzani and supercharged with a roots blower behind the radiator, with four extended drop exhaust pipes. Cooling was by pump and there was a ribbed oil- cooler between the dumb irons. The 105 bhp. engine drove through a Wilson pre-selector gearbox, the bottom gear band of which constituted the clutch, and there were extremely large hydraulic brakes. The Squire would lap Brooklands comfortably at over 100 mph., being capable of 52 mph in second gear, 76 mph. in third gear and of doing 10-70 mph in 15 seconds, and was made in short-and long wheelbase form, the long chassis accommodated Vanden Plas touring bodywork. The inclined radiator enhanced the appearance of this low-build car, of which a single seater was raced at the Track. Naturally such an advanced specification allied to production in very limited numbers necessitated high prices; the short chassis model cost £950 without bodywork in 1935, the long chassis £975.

Layout.Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Cruciform braced frame.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. D.O.H.C. 1469c.c. Transmission.4 speed & reverse, Wilson preselector.

Suspension front. Beam axle /1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle /1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. 15inch drums.

Brakes rear. 15inch drums.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 8ft 6inches.

Engine output. 105 bhp.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed.

Morgan 4/4 1935 1939 Light Sports Roadster England

Morgan built a very low, rigid little sports 2-seater as their first four wheeler, retaining the same coil spring I.f.s. that they had used since 1909. The first cars had a Coventry Climax I.o.E. engine mated to a four speed Meadows gearbox, In 1939 when supplies of this engine ceased an o.h.v. version of the Standard 1126cc engine was offered, allied to a Moss gearbox. The 1098cc Climax unit was used in the rare Le Mans replica model, it had cycle wings and a sloping tail. The chassis was underslung at the back and rough planks laid between the side members formed the floor. A live axle and semi elliptic springs at the rear. Including the 4-seater version and the drophead coupe, eight hundred and twenty four were made between 1936 and 1939.

Layout.Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Steel channel.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. I.o.e. 1122 c.c./1098c.c or o.h.v. 1126cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Sliding pillar I.f.s.

Suspension rear. Live axle 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front.Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase.

Engine output.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed.

MG TA & TB 1936-1939 Light Sports Roadster England

The TA of 1936 was a new rendering of the Midget theme, only this time without the s.o.h.c. engine, instead it had a o.h.v. engine tuned version of the Woseley Ten unit in a new chassis frame, 9inch drum brakes and synchromesh on the top two gears. With more space and performance than the previous model and a softer ride, 3003 were made by the time it was replaced in 1939 by the TB. The TB was fitted with a different o.h.v. engine, this time from the Morris Ten, the 1250cc XPAG unit that became well known as the engine used in all the T’s after the war. This was the only MG sports roadster available when after only a few months and 379 cars, production stopped at the beginning of the war

Layout. Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis. Steel channel.

Engine. TA .4 I.L W.C. O.H.V. 1292cc. TB. 4 I.L. W.C. O.H.V. 1250cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. 9inch Drums.

Brakes rear. 9inch Drums.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 7ft 10inches.

Engine output. TA 50bhp. TB. 54bhp.

@ R.P.M. 4500.

Max speed.

HRG 100 & 1500 1939-1956 Light Sports Roadster England

Shortly before war broke out a 1,100cc model was introduced, using the well-proven Singer o.h.c. engine and gearbox in a slightly scaled-down edition of the 1 1/2-litre car and when supplies of the excellent 4ED engine dried up a 1 1/2-litre Singer power unit was used for the bigger H.R.G. These Singer engines were stripped down in the H.R.G. works and modified to Godfrey’s requirements, the compression-ratio being raised, twin carburettors fitted, and head and manifolding improved, while the stroke of the 1500cc unit was shortened by 2 mm. To bring the capacity within the 1 1/2-litre class The power output was raised to 61, later to 65 bhp, that of the smaller engine to 44 bhp. The H.R.G. thus remained a good sports car, but it retained cable-operated brakes that required heavy pedal pressure (although they could be adjusted from the driving seat and had a fly-off hand lever) and with road springs which, like those of a Bugatti, hardly functioned, it was a tiring car on long journeys. Fourteen 1,100 cc cars were made between 1939 and 1949, and the 1500 was made until 1956.

Layout. Front engine / rear wheel drive.

Chassis.

Engine. 4 I.L. W.C. S.O.H.C. 1074/1435cc.

Transmission. 4 speed & reverse.

Suspension front. Beam axle / 1/4 elliptic.

Suspension rear. Live axle / 1/2 elliptic.

Steering.

Brakes front. Drum.

Brakes rear. Drum.

Weight.

Wheelbase. 8ft 7 1/2 inches.

Engine output. 44/65 bhp.

@ R.P.M.

Max speed. 75 mph plus.
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